Texas Now Preparing For Possible Surge Of 60,000 Haitian Immigrants Rolling Into The State

Texas officials are currently getting prepared for the possibility that a sure of more than 60,000 Haitian migrants that are on their way to the southern border between the U.S. and Mexico.

The Washington Examiner reported that Border Patrol agents, who are currently already overwhelmed by the massive influx of illegal immigrants, have been yanked off border duty to process those individuals who are already in custody.

via Newsmax:

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Texas officials have pushed to make up the absence of the federal patrols along the border. State government and law enforcement leaders spent the weekend preparing for a possible rush of more than 60,000 Haitian migrants, the Examiner reported.

“Texas National Guard is gearing up at the border for increased caravans attempting to cross the border caused by Biden’s open border policy. They are working with the Texas Dept. of Public Safety to seal surge locations at the border & arrest trespassers,” Gov. Greg Abbott said in a tweet posted up on Saturday.

Renae Eze, a spokeswoman for Abbott, noted Texas has deployed thousands of National Guard and Department of Public Safety troopers to the border over the past seven months.

The migrants are not traveling as a single group or caravan. Instead, they are working with cartels to pass through Central America and Mexico to enter the U.S., the Examiner said.

Panama Foreign Minister Erika Mouynes, who is seemingly upset by the fact that President Joe Biden and the rest of his administration ignored her nation’s warning for months about the last wave of migrants, which ended up camping under a bridge in Del Rio, Texas, has once again issued a warning that as many as 60,000 more migrants, made up primarily of Haitians, are currently on their way to the southern border.

“We sounded the alarm when we should have,” Mouynes went on to say during an interview with Axios.


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