New York Jets Chairman Christopher Johnson has stated that he will support and back his players who kneel during the National Anthem by footing the bill for their fines should they choose to carry on with this form of protest next season.

So this guy is going to support his players not only disrespecting the flag and the country that has provided them with the opportunity to make millions of dollars playing a sport, but also the men and women who bled and died to provide them with liberty?

Not cool. Not cool at all.

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The NFL announced the new policy earlier Wednesday, saying that teams can avoid fines by allowing players to stay off the field during the anthem.

Those who remain on the field will be required to stand during the anthem and will be penalized if they protest.

“Do I prefer that they stand? Of course. But I understand if they felt the need to protest,” Johnson said.

“There are some big, complicated issues that we’re all struggling with, and our players are on the front lines,” he continued. “I don’t want to come down on them like a ton of bricks, and I won’t.”

He added that if the team is fined over the protests, “that’s just something I’ll have to bear.”

The Jets are owned by Johnson’s brother, Woody Johnson, who has been on leave since he was appointed by President Trump to serve as the U.S. ambassador to Britain. Christopher Johnson is serving as acting owner of the team.

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While this does seem insulting, it’s key to note that during the last NFL season, there were no players on the Jets who actually knelt for the anthem.

The bottom line on this issue is that if you want to protest an issue, do so on your own time, not on company time, especially when doing so hurts those who have sacrificed so much to ensure you have the freedom to do what you want with your life.

There are better ways to utilize your platform as a professional athlete for the causes you support.

Source: The Hill

 

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