New Report Reveals At Least 118 Police Officers Left Seattle Department This Year

A report by Jason Rantz of KTTH states that there have been at least 118 law enforcement professionals who have left the Seattle Police Department this year, with a whopping 39 of them having called it quits in September alone.

“The typical number for that month is between 5 and 7,” adding, “The mass exodus of officers started in May with 10 separations, followed by 16 in June, 10 in July and 14 in August. … The majority of the resignations and retirements were patrol officers,” Rantz reported.

via Daily Wire:

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Seattle Police Officer Guild President Mike Solan told Rantz, “Your 911 call for help will go unanswered for a significant amount of time.” He added “This is fixable if our elected leaders start supporting police, instead of pandering to a large activist crowd that’s dividing us when we need unity. False narratives about good people doing policing, pushed by the defund movement, is making our public safety efforts devolve further.”

City documents acknowledged that the median priority 1 response times, which are dangerous crimes that demand an immediate response, were a torpid nine minutes in the North Precinct from July through September.

In July, Rantz made a public disclosure request for separation data from the previous two months but the SPD rejected the request, responding, “Your request seeks information or asks questions and does not identify specific public records. As such it is not a request for identifiable public records.”

Things for police officers has not improved at all over the last few months, as radicals in the Black Lives Matter movement continue to push for departments across the nation to be defunded, which will immediately result in less police presence on the streets, especially in minority neighborhoods who need the protection the most.

Here’s to hoping this changes soon. We need our officers.